Author Topic: Jussie Smollet  (Read 7042 times)

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Offline Rage Against the McKee

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #225 on: March 14, 2019, 11:20:22 AM »
16 felony charges is insane. The stacking of felonies is one of the worst parts of our justice system. Give him 1 month jail, a big fine, and let's move on.

No time in jail. Just put him in the database and make him tell all of his neighbors this dumbass story from now until the end of time.

Offline Tubesock

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #226 on: March 14, 2019, 11:25:20 AM »
I would like an app where individuals are reviewed so that people or businesses that encounter them can know what they are dealing with quickly and efficiently
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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #227 on: March 14, 2019, 11:29:53 AM »
They already have that and it's called your Uber rating (4.94)
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Offline dal9

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #228 on: March 14, 2019, 11:47:46 AM »
the reason hate crimes are punished more harshly than other crimes is the societal strife they cause.  for the same reason, i don't mind punishing fake hate crimes relatively harshly.

additionally, there is an argument that punishing celebrities harshly is a particularly effective deterrent, since those are the cases people pay attention to.

Offline catastrophe

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Jussie Smollet
« Reply #229 on: March 14, 2019, 11:48:22 AM »
I think we should just put false accusers on some sort of list, similar to the sex offenders list, where they are legally required to notify all of their neighbors/employers about their past accusations whenever they move, change jobs, etc. Imprisonment doesn't really serve any sort of purpose for them, imo.

Ok, I like this idea more. Jail/Prison is an overused punishment that usually does more harm than good to society.

Maybe make it like a 10 year deal instead of life though. I’m still a believer in rehabilitation.

Offline bubbles4ksu

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #230 on: March 14, 2019, 12:34:43 PM »
Man, you people really like to imprison people
I like to imprison the right people.  We should've hanged a few hundred people on Wall St. after 2007.

16 felony charges is insane. The stacking of felonies is one of the worst parts of our justice system. Give him 1 month jail, a big fine, and let's move on.

No time in jail. Just put him in the database and make him tell all of his neighbors this dumbass story from now until the end of time.
I had a long post typed up about a social credit system like China has but only about 1/3 of posts from my work computer go through.

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #231 on: March 14, 2019, 12:41:24 PM »
Man, you people really like to imprison people
I like to imprison the right people.  We should've hanged a few hundred people on Wall St. after 2007.

Def agree
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Offline michigancat

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #232 on: March 14, 2019, 02:16:15 PM »
16 felony charges are an outrage. The next time DNA clears some dude who has served 25 years on death row are they going to find the cracker who took the stand with obvious bullshit eyewitness testimony and put them in jail? That crap is 1000x more harmful to individuals and society and they haven't locked any of those people up.

This is one of the first that comes to mind, I'm sure MIR is aware: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Banks_(American_football)

There was a very similar case more recently in Georgia.

don't know much about that case but it seems way worse than Jussie since there was a specific victim

Offline steve dave

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #233 on: March 14, 2019, 02:39:28 PM »
Absolutely way worse


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Offline MakeItRain

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #234 on: March 15, 2019, 12:06:36 AM »
the reason hate crimes are punished more harshly than other crimes is the societal strife they cause.  for the same reason, i don't mind punishing fake hate crimes relatively harshly.

additionally, there is an argument that punishing celebrities harshly is a particularly effective deterrent, since those are the cases people pay attention to.

Others punishment isn't a deterrent to bad behavior, at all.

Offline Dlew12

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #235 on: March 15, 2019, 11:45:50 AM »
the reason hate crimes are punished more harshly than other crimes is the societal strife they cause.  for the same reason, i don't mind punishing fake hate crimes relatively harshly.

additionally, there is an argument that punishing celebrities harshly is a particularly effective deterrent, since those are the cases people pay attention to.

Others punishment isn't a deterrent to bad behavior, at all.
Is there a study or something to back this up you have?  Public deterrence is a pretty well-established punishment rationale in the CJ system. 


"You want to stand next to someone and not be able to hear them, walk your ass into Manhattan, Kansas." - [REDACTED]

Offline catastrophe

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #236 on: March 15, 2019, 12:48:19 PM »
The death penalty is probably a good example. I seem to recall that it really hasn’t done much to curb the rate of capital offenses in states where it is available.

Offline MakeItRain

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #237 on: March 15, 2019, 02:01:29 PM »
the reason hate crimes are punished more harshly than other crimes is the societal strife they cause.  for the same reason, i don't mind punishing fake hate crimes relatively harshly.

additionally, there is an argument that punishing celebrities harshly is a particularly effective deterrent, since those are the cases people pay attention to.

Others punishment isn't a deterrent to bad behavior, at all.
Is there a study or something to back this up you have?  Public deterrence is a pretty well-established punishment rationale in the CJ system.

Uh no, I thought what I said was common sense. Is there a large populace of people out there committing jailable crimes that don't know that punishment is possible if they get caught? Isn't committing a crime essentially a study in opportunity cost? When you choose to commit a crime you feel like either you're not going to get caught, or doing whatever you're not supposed to be doing is worth the penalty when you do get caught. Is there some other option I'm unaware of?

Offline Dlew12

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #238 on: March 15, 2019, 02:45:11 PM »
the reason hate crimes are punished more harshly than other crimes is the societal strife they cause.  for the same reason, i don't mind punishing fake hate crimes relatively harshly.

additionally, there is an argument that punishing celebrities harshly is a particularly effective deterrent, since those are the cases people pay attention to.

Others punishment isn't a deterrent to bad behavior, at all.
Is there a study or something to back this up you have?  Public deterrence is a pretty well-established punishment rationale in the CJ system.

Uh no, I thought what I said was common sense. Is there a large populace of people out there committing jailable crimes that don't know that punishment is possible if they get caught? Isn't committing a crime essentially a study in opportunity cost? When you choose to commit a crime you feel like either you're not going to get caught, or doing whatever you're not supposed to be doing is worth the penalty when you do get caught. Is there some other option I'm unaware of?
I think that's the wrong question.  A better question imo is "Would there be a larger populace of people out there committing crimes if they knew they'd get no jail time (or only little jail time) for the crimes?"  I think the answer to that question is "Probably."



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Offline catastrophe

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Jussie Smollet
« Reply #239 on: March 15, 2019, 04:21:30 PM »
I think MIR’s point is that how the system treats any one particular person is not going to affect decisions made by others. People are generally aware there are consequences for committing crimes even if they haven’t studied the sentencing guidelines. The fear of punishment in general is the main deterrent.

It undercuts the rationale of “making an example” of high profile criminals.

Offline Dlew12

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #240 on: March 19, 2019, 05:09:27 PM »
I think MIR’s point is that how the system treats any one particular person is not going to affect decisions made by others. People are generally aware there are consequences for committing crimes even if they haven’t studied the sentencing guidelines. The fear of punishment in general is the main deterrent.

It undercuts the rationale of “making an example” of high profile criminals.
I agree with that. But I think there's a difference in the relative deterrent value of the punishment (is the punishment a small fine?  a large fine?  a month in jail?  a year in jail?).  That said, I think there's an extreme diminishing return.  I think the relative deterrent value between 3 years in jail (for example) and 60 years in jail is probably less than the relative deterrent value between 6 months in jail and 5 years in jail.
 
BTW, I'm pulling this out of my ass and only speaking about my own imo.  FWIW, I don't think it's a good policy to "make an example" out of anyone beyond what's normally associated with the normal public deterrence rationale.


"You want to stand next to someone and not be able to hear them, walk your ass into Manhattan, Kansas." - [REDACTED]

Offline 'taterblast

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #241 on: March 26, 2019, 10:28:35 AM »

Offline steve dave

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #242 on: March 26, 2019, 10:31:39 AM »
a lot of you people look like fools now. FOOLS!

Offline MakeItRain

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #243 on: March 26, 2019, 10:32:34 AM »
Hell of a blow to white fragility and damn near all of you who wanted to put this dude in jail.

Online Dugout DickStone

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #244 on: March 26, 2019, 10:35:22 AM »
so his lawyer, Geragos, was named as a co-conspirator with stormy's lawyer yesterday.  This is a weird coincidence

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #245 on: March 26, 2019, 10:38:29 AM »
Maga is going to lose it's crap  :sdeek:

What an interesting turn
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Offline K-S-U-Wildcats!

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #246 on: March 26, 2019, 10:43:02 AM »
He should have done at least 30 days in jail and paid restitution for the hoax. I guess "community service" instead. Maybe the hit to his career will be punishment enough.
I've said it before and I'll say it again, K-State fans could have beheaded the entire KU team at midcourt, and K-State fans would be celebrating it this morning.  They are the ISIS of Big 12 fanbases.

Online Dugout DickStone

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #247 on: March 26, 2019, 10:45:44 AM »
Maga is going to lose it's crap  :sdeek:

What an interesting turn

They are going to flip

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #248 on: March 26, 2019, 10:49:18 AM »
Totally exonerated
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Offline catastrophe

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Re: Jussie Smollet
« Reply #249 on: March 26, 2019, 10:50:47 AM »
Time to start prosecuting the people that accused him of committing a crime.